MK on the Mic

Sejal and MK on the Mic Talking All Things Taboo

What a way to start 2020 than to be featured exclusively on a podcast with the wonderful MK on the Mic. Listed on The Great British Podcasts’ Most Popular Podcasts of 2019, we discuss all things taboo – from sex, cultural appropriation to inter-racial relationships. Available on Spotify and iTunes. Click on the links below to tune in!

iTunes – https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/mk-on-the-mic/id1247260719

Spotify  – https://open.spotify.com/show/5aru4tsvIm4CSQc5SasU8j

 

Meera Syal

‘Life Isn’t All Ha Ha Hee Hee’: British Asian Writer Meera Syal’s Iconic Novel Celebrated 20 Years on by South Asian Sisters Speak

“…Published 20 years ago, Meera Syal’s novel was light years ahead of its time. Her words were gospel to my ears as the narrative followed the trials and tribulations of three British Asian young females — all of whom were walking different paths of their lives — yet coming together in sister solidarity. Thus began my understanding of what we often quote as the South Asian diaspora..”

My latest Brown Girl Magazine on celebrating Meera Syal’s iconic novel “Life Isn’t All Ha Ha Hee Hee” with South Asian Sisters Speak

Brown Girl Magazine U.K.’s ‘Disrupt’ Exhibition with TedxUCLWomen

Brown Girl Magazine U.K. exhibited “Disrupt” at TedxUCLWomen – a collection of stories at the that represent how, through our platform, across the world, South Asian women are “disrupting” the status quo and shaking up the dialogue in our communities. By championing women of colour who disrupt the narrative of cultural or societal formed norms – through arts, politics, or simply humanitarian channels, these stories are a reflection of how each of these women are shifting paradigms to create their own paths that define their individuality. Check out the photos from the event below.

 

DISRUPT- Brown Girl Magazine U.K. exhibition at TedXUCLWomen event Saturday 1 December

Brown Girl Magazine was created by and for South Asian women globally who believe in the power of storytelling as a vehicle for community building and empowerment. BGM U.K. will display a collection of stories at the TedXUCLWomen exhibition that represent how, through our platform, across the world, South Asian women are “disrupting” the status quo and shaking up the dialogue in our communities. By championing women of colour who disrupt the narrative of cultural or societal formed norms – through arts, politics, or simply humanitarian channels, these stories are a reflection of how each of these women are shifting paradigms to create their own paths that define their individuality. 

Mann Mukti

What Stops South Asians From Discussing Mental Health?

…”In the journey of creating an identity on foreign soil, South Asian family and friends alike stick together in times of both successes and struggles. So, should we feel guilty when we turn to a medical professional in moments of despair, if every door around us appears shut?…”

Read my full article on what stops South Asians from discussing mental health in my latest Brown Girl Magazine feature here.

Mann Mukti

Let’s Talk About Grief

..”So let’s talk! Let’s talk about grief, about loss, about that gap we are feeling. Let’s stop conforming to societal ideals of behavioural patterns, stop the judgement of who is hurting more than who by decibels of cries. Cast aside criticisms of not adhering to customs for the sake of one’s sanity, and an individual’s right to express and not suppress..”

Read my latest feature with Mann Mukti, on breaking stereotypes of dealing with grief.

Originally published here

Food For Thought

‘Meat Came Between Me and My Man’ — U.K. Female Artists Share Food For Thought

“It’s often been said that a way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. Being a woman of South Asian descent, however, I firmly believe that there is no bigger love for a desi woman than that of her mother’s soul-infused culinary delights…#FoodForThought reflected precisely that!”

Check out my latest Brown Girl Magazine feature here on the talented Anjali Mya Chadha‘s clever production on food and empowerment with Tara Arts.

Dear Dad: A Father’s Day Tribute From Brown Girl Magazine

Not enough credit is given to those fathers that raise a daughter to be a feminist and remind me that I am more than just an element of my cultural background – I am me. So Pops, I want to thank you today for being more than just a father, but for being a friend to me and my sisters. You have never let me forget that honesty and sincerity come hand in hand with hard work if I really want to reach for success. Thank you for always supporting me in my life choices and defending me against the stereotypes of following an expected linear path just to uphold societal acceptance. My passion for travelling was inherited from your curiosity of the beauty of this planet and it’s because of the sacrifices you and mum made that I was privileged to explore the world from such a young age. Thank you for always listening and never judging, something I can only strive to continually do. Most importantly, thank you for trusting me as YOUR friend, for picking up the phone and turning to me when you also needed a friendly ear. If there is one thing I would ask you to do, is love yourself as much as me and the girls love you. Don’t underestimate the importance you hold in our lives. You held my hand, now let me hold yours. Love you always and more… Seju xx

Read the full Brown Girl Magazine Writers’ Father’s Day Tribute here